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Hobo Spiders

Hobo Spiders

Hobo Spiders also known as Aggressive House Spiders can easily be confused with other spiders because of its common features and colors. They resemble many other common spiders such as wolf spiders and, some people have mistaken them for the brown recluse spider. Characteristics to identify a hobo spider are difficult to see with for the average person and require close examination for proper identification.
If someone has ever told you that they’ve been chased by a hobo spider, they just may be telling the truth. Hobo spiders are labeled as aggressive but they usually are not, UNLESS it feels threatened. Hobo spiders are extremely protective of their egg sacs and will bite if they sense a threat to their young. Oftentimes, humans do not realize that they are approaching upon a hobo spider, this often occurs when a spider is residing in dark areas.
As a species of house spider, hobo spiders are commonly found in and around human dwellings and structures. They prefer dark, less used areas, inside they can be found it corners, basements, and cluttered areas that don’t have much activity. Outside they can be found in a variety of spaces such as woodpiles, rock/flower beds, along fences, fields, in the grass and areas where it can weave a funnel web.
Similar to other spiders, Hobo spiders weave webs in the shape of funnels and it’s usually waiting inside to catch prey. The web of a hobo is not very sticky so once an insect gets caught, the hobo spider has to act quickly and attack to ensure it doesn’t escape. The web is also acts mating grounds. Females generally stay within the perimeter of their nests, while males move about in search of potential mating partners. Males have to cautiously approach their female counterparts, attempting to mate only after finding that the female is receptive, rather than hostile. If the female is hostile, she may attack and kill him. Females remain in their nests after mating. Males will move on and usually die soon after mating.
Like most of the spider species, female hobo spiders have larger abdomens and are larger than males. Females can grow in excess of 14 mm in length, while males are rarely longer than 11 mm. Its brown legs are a solid color, show no markings or rings and are smooth looking. They have a herringbone pattern on the top side of their abdomens. The males have larger appendage that are often referred to as “boxing gloves”. These are not fangs, but are merely the hobo spider’s reproductive organs.
Hobo spiders are thought to have necrotic venom, similar to the brown recluse spider, however, there is currently no solid scientific evidence suggesting that the venom of this species is of medical importance. The research results that were used to report the necrotic effects of the venom have not been consistently reproduced. This spider may or may not be a venomous as people believed. No matter the type, no one wants to be bitten by a spider.

Always to remember to use caution if you think you have hobo spiders in your home and to call a professional that can help identify and take care of the problem.
Give us a call (208)475-4440

http://www.alphahomepestcontrol.com

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